Radio Shack was a big player in the computer
business starting in the 1970s with the TRS-80 line of computers. In fact, by the mid 80’s Radio Shack was
selling at least a half dozen different computers. And I don’t just mean different variations,
but rather completely different and incompatible computer architectures. For example, they were still selling the TRS-80
line of computers, mostly as business machines at this point. These were extremely expensive, often selling
for thousands of dollars. For the home market, they also had the Color
Computer, which was much cheaper, starting at $239. In fact, at even lower cost, they had the
short-lived Color Computer MC-10, which was a separate architecture from the regular one. You could get one of these for just over a
hundred dollars. They also had the popular Model-100 portable
computer. And if that was too large, then there was
their line of pocket computers. In the early 1980s it was not uncommon for
computers completely incompatible with one another. And that would include big players from companies
like Commodore, or Atari, or pretty much anybody else. In fact, there were probably a hundred different
computer architectures at the time that were completely incompatible with each other. However, in 1984, that started to change with
the introduction of MS-DOS compatible computers. And Radio Shack also saw an opportunity here. Now, they had already been selling their Tandy
2000 line of computers, which claimed to be MS-DOS compatible. However, it wasn’t nearly compatible enough,
and more or less only worked with text-based MS-DOS software. It also started around $2,750, which wasn’t
exactly cheap at the time, but it did have a 80186 running twice the speed of IBMs product,
however it was never a huge market success due to lack of compatible software. But Tandy’s success with IBM compatibles
would change in November of 1984 with the introduction of the
Tandy 1000. To understand the Tandy 1000, we really need
to look at IBM’s own PCjr product, which had come to market 8 months earlier. The PCJr was supposed to be IBM’s way to
better enter the home market. However, it had several problems keeping it
from succeeding. Notably, it had a terrible chiclet style keyboard,
very little RAM compared to the regular IBM PC, and it wasn’t 100% compatible either. What’s worse, it sold at a price much too
high for the home market. However, the PCJr did have two things going
for it. For one thing, they had upgraded the CGA graphics
so that it could finally display a full 16 colors even on an RGBI monitor, which was
the standard monitor type most people were using. IBM also included a 3-voice sound chip, based
on the Texas Instruments SN76496 sound generator. This same sound chip was already used in dozens
of arcade machines and in several home computers such as the TI-994a, and the BBC Micro, and
also in several notable game consoles such as the Sega Genesis, and the ColecoVision. When Tandy set out to make a new IBM compatible
system, they were actually shooting to make an IBM PCjr compatible system. And thus, they incorporated the graphics and
sound from the PCjr into their new Tandy 1000 system. However, by the time the Tandy 1000 came to
maket, it became clear the PCjr wasn’t doing as well as they thought. So, they kind of dropped the PCjr aspect from
all of the marketing material and instead just said the Tandy 1000 was an MS-DOS computer. But, what Tandy ended up making was actually
a better IBM than IBM was making themselves. The Tandy had a more modern appearance than
the IBM and most of the other clones. There are a few things that really set the
Tandy 1000 apart from IBM. For one thing, a lot of things were actually
integrated onto the motherboard, such as the video, the audio, a serial port, a somewhat
proprietary printer port, and even two joystick ports. All of these things were actually separate
cards on an IBM system and even on most clones of the time. This helped to reduce costs. In fact, the concept of having a chipset on
a motherboard started right here with the Tandy 1000, as it was the first computer to
integrate most of the glue logic, disk controllers, and other things into a single chip. So, while some criticized the original Tandy
1000 for only having 3 expansion slots, the reality is didn’t need very many because
it came with everything already on the board, where an IBM would come with 5 slots and 4
of them would be filled up right from the start. The keyboard was a bit unusual as well. They tried to make the keyboard smaller, but
still retain a lot of keys, and so everything is really crammed together. There are some keys that are in unusual places
such as the locations of control and alt. In fact, doing the reset of control-alt-delete
is very unusual on this keyboard. But I think the thing that annoys me the most
is this placement of the hold key directly above the arrow keys. Since the arrow keys are not split off from
the rest of the keyboard, it is quite possible to wind up pressing other nearby keys in the
heat of playing a game because you can’t feel the arrow keys as being separate. But this hold key, is the most annoying thing
to press because it actually pauses the entire computer. So, if you aren’t accustomed to this, you
will at first think the computer has locked up for whatever reason, but pressing the hold
key again will resume it. The joystick ports were non-standard for PCs,
but instead used the same joystick as was used on the Tandy Color Computer already,
meaning the joysticks were easily available and Tandy could share at least that one peripheral
between the computers. Joysticks were actually not that common at
the time anyway since IBM never intended their PCs to really be used for games. After all, IBM felt that marketing their computers
as game machines would probably hurt their reputation in the business market. And one place this was particularly apparent
was in their choice of video cards. Even after IBM had given up on the PCJr, they
continued to sell their PCs with standard CGA graphics. So, while games on an IBM XT would look more
or less like this. The same game on a Tandy would look like this. And while games on the XT sounded like this,
games on the Tandy machine sounded like this. And thus, the graphics and sound eventually
became known as Tandy Graphics and Tandy sound, even though it actually originated on the
PCjr. The interesting thing is, the Tandy machines
used the same monitor type as any IBM computer with a CGA card would use. That’s because the 4-color limitation of
IBM’s CGA card was actually not a limitation of the monitor itself, rather it was a limitation
of the video card. And thus, you can use any CGA monitor on your
Tandy 1000 and enjoy full 16 color graphics. Just to clarify the graphical capabilities. Regular CGA had essentially 3 modes. You had text mode with all 16 colors. Then you had the 320×200 graphics mode with
4 colors. This was the most common mode used in games. Then you had a high resolution mode with only
2 colors. Some business applications and a few games
made use of this. But, this is essentially what you got with
a regular IBM PC or a compatible clone. Yes, there were some other modes like composite
mode and some undocumented tricks that could get you some extra color with various tradeoffs,
but the reality is, this was what most PC users had to deal with at the time. With the Tandy machines, you also had a low-resolution
mode with 16 colors. Some games made use of this mode. I believe some of the early Sierra games like
Kings Quest used this. You also got the 320×200 mode with a full
16 colors. This was the mode most games made use of. Then there was a high resolution mode with
4 colors, which was seldom used. And later model Tandy machines even added
a 16 color high resolution mode, which is even more rare because software developers
would be hesitant to use this and advertise their software works with Tandy 1000 machines
because most customers wouldn’t know if their Tandy 1000 supported this mode or not. One other interesting tidbit is the way in
which Tandy graphics worked on composite video. You see, on an IBM PC, the CGA card would
output a different set of colors depending on whether you were viewing it on a composite
or RGB monitor. And thus, software companies would have to
write special support to handle both, or just do like most did and and just support the
RGB mode and forget about the composite mode since not that many users had composite monitors. But, with the Tandy, it actually outputs exactly
the same colors, more or less, on composite and RGB. Thus giving Tandy users another choice for
video. Now let’s talk about the sound chip. Typically you’ll hear it referred to as
the Tandy 3-Voice system, and that’s because the chip has 3 programmable square wave voices. They can’t really produce any other sort
of waveform, and they don’t even have an ADSR system like the SID chip has in the Commodore
64. However, each channel does have an independent
volume control. So, it’s certainly possible to use the CPU
to artificially create an ADSR envelop so that sounds like bells or flutes can be created. However, the system is actually more powerful
than it would seem. In fact, it has a 4th voice for a noise channel. So, really, they should have called it a 4
voice system. But wait, there’s more. You see, they needed the PC-Speaker to be
backwards compatible with other IBM software, so that sound is also mixed in with the sound
output giving you essentially a 5th voice if you want. And, to top it off later Tandy models even
included an 8-bit digital to analog converter as a 6th voice which is meant for playback
of digitized sounds. However, because not all Tandy machines had
this, few games actually made use of it. Beyond just the hardware, Tandy 1000s shipped
with a product called DeskMate. It was a graphical operating system but it
could be controlled with a keyboard or mouse. It included a variety of productivity applications,
such as a very minimal word processor. While not as advanced as MacWrite or other
graphical word processors, it could get the job done. It also had a pretty functional spreadsheet. You know, a lot of this stuff has to be compared
with what was available at the time, and how much all of these things would have cost had
the user bought them separately. This came with the computer. It had a very nice calendar program that would
allow you to schedule appointments and stuff. And it had a little drawing program, sort
of like windows Paint of the era. Speaking of that, I should point out this
whole suite of software runs on the high resolution 16 color mode of Tandy’s graphics chip,
which no other IBM compatible would have had the ability to do, at least not until EGA
graphics became widespread. Speaking of that, it also included a musical
composition application which took advantage of the Tandy’s 3 voice sound hardware, again
something not available on other computers. And last but not least, it had a terminal
application for using your modem. So, for the home user of the time, DeskMate
gave functionality almost equivalent to a Microsoft Windows, keeping in mind that during
this time Windows wasn’t all that much more advanced than DeskMate. The Tandy 1000 started off selling for $1,199. Which, was actually quite a steal. In fact, Radio Shack said it best themselves
right here in their catalog. “Indeed, an IBM PC equipped with 256K of
RAM and a color monitor will run you over $3,100. The equivalent Tandy 1000 is only $2,048 and
gives you superior graphics in up to four times as many colors.” The Tandy 1000 was a great sales success from
day one. In fact, sales were higher the first month
after launch than any other computer in Radio Shack’s history. Of course, not all Tandy enthusiasts were
on board with this. This article in info world talks about how
Tandy users are disappointed that the firm is no longer setting standards, but following
them. However, history shows that Tandy did in fact
make the right move with this computer and over time they would slowly phase out all
of their other computer architectures. This was really the start an industry wide
phenomenon. Up to this point nearly every computer was
incompatible with the next, which meant that software had to be designed separately for
every computer. But 1984 to 85 is when a lot of IBM clones
or “MS-DOS” computers would start to show up on the market. But none of them would have the 16 color graphics
and 3-voice sound of the Tandy, or the visibility of seeing them on the shelf of every Radio
Shack store. Thus, providing the Tandy 1000 an edge for
years to come. Of course, in order to use the Tandy graphics
and sound, games had to be specially designed to support it. If it didn’t include support, then Tandy
users could still run their games in regular 4 color CGA. However, this wasn’t a huge problem since
many software companies saw the success of the Tandy 1000 and thus more and more started
to integrate support for the graphics and sound into their games. In fact, if you look on Mobygames, you’ll
see there are 861 games claiming to have Tandy graphics support. That’s no small number. The Tandy 1000 was selling so well that in
1986 it enjoyed a 9.5% market share of all computers sold in the United States Of course, Tandy continued to make new versions
of the Tandy 1000. But, it’s important to understand that not
all Tandy computers are Tandy 1000s. Even their MS-DOS compatible computers. Take this Tandy 1400 laptop for example. You know, it’s made by Tandy. It does run MS-DOS compatible software. And it even has a name that sounds a lot like
1000 because it’s one thousand, four hundred. But, it doesn’t have the special 16 color
CGA or the 3 channel sound system that the Tandy 1000 does. Only models that are called Tandy 1000 have
those modes. So, in order for them to keep the Tandy 1000
name, they just added different letters to the end like 1000sx, or tx, or tl. One of the next models they produced was the
1000sx, which looks almost identical to the original except the floppy drives are beige
instead of black. However, it did include a faster processor
and internally it had 5 card slots instead of 3 like the original. A popular upgrade for this computer was to
have a hard-card, which was a hard drive integrated onto a single expansion card. One really popular version was an all-in-one
cost-reduced version called the 1000EX, which came out in 1987. It almost looked like a big brother to RadioShack’s
color computer 2. It had a single floppy drive in the side similar
to an Apple Iic, Amiga or Atari ST of the day. Also on the side, you get a volume control
for the internal Tandy sound, a head phone jack, and two joystick ports. Again, still using the same joystick ports
as the color computer series. And placing this stuff on the side where it
is easy to reach makes far more sense than most PCs of the era where this stuff was on
the rear. Speaking of the rear, they were still sticking
with their proprietary printer port. This next port is a proprietary port for an
external floppy drive like this one. This way you could have two floppy drives
like most desktop style PCs. Also you get composite video, RGB video, and
3 expansion slots you could put whatever you wanted in. The EX model came with a faster processor,
clocking in at 7.16 Mhz. One interesting thing, probably done in the
name of compactness, was that it has non standard expansion slots. So, the top cover comes off like this. And then inside you will see 3 expansion slots. This model already has a modem here on top,
along with 1 free slot. If we remove the modem, you’ll see a memory
upgrade card in here that brings the memory up to 640K, and then as you can see, it has
a pass-through for two more cards to sit on top. These slots are proprietary, however, it is
possible to use an adapter such as this one, and it will give you a standard ISA slot. So, assuming the card is small enough, such
as this XT-IDE card, you can use standard ISA cards in here. Also, an external drive was available if you
wanted to have two floppy drives, which was a common setup for most PCs of the era. On awkward issue with this computer, however
was always monitor placement. It looks like maybe you could set a monitor
on top, but you can’t. Ideally you’d want a computer desk with
a monitor shelf, or you could use the shelf that they advertised along with the computer. The HX model sold for $799, which was actually
a really good deal at the time for an IBM compatible computer of any sort, much less
one with superior graphics and sound, plus a faster CPU. And this computer was very popular. However, 5 and a quarter inch floppy disks
were starting to go out of style in the late 1980s, so the very next year in 1988 they
replaced the EX with the HX model. The HX moved the floppy drive to the front,
along with a second drive bay where you could mount either an additional floppy drive or
even a hard drive. However, one neat feature of the HX model
is that it can boot from ROM. So if you have no disk in the drive, and presumably
no hard drive, it will boot MS-DOS 2.11 from ROM. That’s really handy because that means if
you want to play a game from disk, for example, you don’t have to boot a DOS disk first. The HX model was better, but sold for only
$699, which was a hundred dollars cheaper than the previous model. This was one of the best selling Tandy 1000
machines ever made. An interesting comparison to make would be
with the Amiga 500, which was also selling for $699 at the time. There’s no question the Amiga was better
in terms of graphics and sound, but the Tandy certainly had an advantage of a much larger
software library. Of course, by the 1990s the Tandy 1000 was
starting to lose its competitive edge. And the competition was coming in on multiple
different fronts. For one thing, Tandy’s 16-color graphics
and 3-voice sound was no longer at the head of its game. Computers with 256 color VGA cards had become
somewhat common and seemed to be the new emerging standard. And by this time sound cards like the Ad-Lib
and Sound Blaster were starting to become standardized as well. What’s worse, Microsoft had continued to
improve Windows and thus Deskmate had fallen drastically behind. In fact, by 1991 even Radio Shack’s own
catalog actually recommended that customers run Microsoft Windows on most of their high
end computers, relegating DeskMate to their less expensive computers. The all-in-one computers like the EX and HX
had disappeared from their catalogs, although it can still be seen as a prop for advertising
their monitor stand. Later models like the 1000 RLX actually removed
the 16-color graphics system that made Tandy machine so successful and instead included
256-color VGA graphics, much like the rest of the market. However, it did still retain the 3-voice sound
chip. Which, wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. After all, most PCs of the era still didn’t
ship with a sound card from the factory. It was typically something the user would
buy and install themselves. So a Tandy system still sounded better than
a regular PC. By 1993, Tandy was no longer competitive in
the PC market and so they sold all of their facilities in Fort Worth, Texas to AST Computer. Which is interesting because I ended up working
for AST starting in 1996 in their tech support department, and so I actually ended up taking
calls every now and then for Tandy machines because AST had agreed to handle all remaining
support for those machines. While the Tandy 1000 hasn’t appeared in
many movies or TV shows, it is featured prominently in the current hit series Young Sheldon in
many episodes. And so that about wraps up this documentary
on the Tandy 1000. I hope I was able to shed a little bit of
light on what made the 1000 a special computer at the time. It was far more than just an MS-DOS compatible
computer, in fact I think that at one time in history it was the best MS-DOS compatible
computer that you could buy. Now, obviously that didn’t last long but
nevertheless, I think its very historically important to put this computer in its place
and tell the real story about what it was. So, anyway, thats about it so, ugh thank you
guys for watching!

The Tandy 1000 – The best MS-DOS computer in 1984.
Tagged on:                                                                                                                 

100 thoughts on “The Tandy 1000 – The best MS-DOS computer in 1984.

  • September 12, 2019 at 5:20 am
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    I worked for Radio Shack and sold all this hardware back in those days. I owned a complete Color Computer system with maxed ram and dual floppy drives. Remember "Leisure Suit Larry"

    Reply
  • September 12, 2019 at 7:30 am
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    King's Quest! Loved that game.

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  • September 13, 2019 at 2:52 pm
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    Name of the game at 5:17?
    One of my favorites from that time but the name is lost

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  • September 15, 2019 at 11:59 pm
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    هل يوجد ترجمة العربية؟

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 1:38 am
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    Cant wait for the big solar flare that knocks us back to the stone age. My kids will have a much better life 🙂

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:30 am
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    2:04 who thinks Kryton from Red Dwarf.

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  • September 21, 2019 at 3:27 am
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    6:15 the first one is cooler

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  • September 22, 2019 at 12:20 am
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    are u flu ??

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  • September 22, 2019 at 9:13 am
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    I still have the TRS-80 computer in a box in my basement (the one on the left at 0:39). It worked the last time I checked. I have the TRS-80 pocket computer also. I think it still works. I did notice a little bleeding on the top of the display.

    I enjoyed toying around with both of them when I was a teenager. The pocket computer I used the most of course since I was taking it everywhere with me. That thing was so cool back then.

    Btw, the TRS-80 could be upgraded to include 16 colors. I had that done to mine. The upgrade ate half of the computer storage though. I think it was 16k memory originally and around 8k with the upgrade. However, you got 16 colors… 16! How sweet is that?!

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 10:11 am
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    I'd love to find me one of these computers. I remember as a little kid drooling over a Tandy of some type at Radio Shack and in some catalog or another. We eventually got an Apple IIGS, which was great as that was what we had at middle school. Used that all the way through HS, and it was 2 years later before I finally got my own computer, a Sony Pentium II machine with a 6.4HD and 32mb of ram.

    Reply
  • September 25, 2019 at 11:13 pm
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    I had a TRS 80 in the 80s. I can't find any pics of it. Cause the one I had was real small. More kid size. It was a full computer. Cause, I had an adapter that turned a tape player into a loading device.

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  • September 26, 2019 at 6:52 am
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    I built a breakout box back in the day for the 1000 HX to provide 8 bit ISA slots for the Tandy XT hard disk upgrade, and a CD-Rom Drive. Worked pretty decently, although the interconnect cable had to be really short. I even tried to build a side-by-side CPU board with the co-processor socket so it could be added in, and while it showed some promise I never finished the project. I used to work in a Tandy Computer Center / Radio Shack, good times. Miss those days.

    Reply
  • September 26, 2019 at 2:59 pm
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    damn you had a good amount of hair back then..

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 7:33 am
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    2:04 who raided area 51 in the early 90s? they should've come.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 4:07 am
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    I thought it said "The Tiddy 1000". I guess people see what they want to see…

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  • October 2, 2019 at 6:58 pm
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    What's with your EX having wires sticking out of the printer and disk drive ports?

    Reply
  • October 4, 2019 at 9:11 am
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    please subtitles in portuguese we love old pc ❤️

    Reply
  • October 6, 2019 at 3:26 am
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    Day of the Tentacle!!

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  • October 8, 2019 at 1:42 am
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    the first time i ever played a video game was on a tandy 1000 and i'm only 27 we where poor back then my mom had bought it from a garage sale because the playstation had just come out and was to expensive for us and she felt bad i remember playing roger rabbit every single original kings quest including all of space quest games it finally met its end when my basment got flooded it was in a box on the floor so it was a lost cause but i did sell the original monitor that still work for it to a guy that needed one for his tandy 1000 i do miss that familliar beep the it made when loading

    Reply
  • October 8, 2019 at 8:27 am
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    There's a lot of nostalgia for these machines, but they aren't really very good. The monitors are terrible and the machines are poorly built and have compatibility issues. They also tended to be behind the rest of the machines.

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  • October 8, 2019 at 11:56 am
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    Dear friend. I would like that you analize three machines that I consider them "out of their time" … 1-NewBrain machine with two absolute diferent funcionalities a- the capacity of making its own diskettes formats and b-2MB Ram capacity ( in 1981 ?? ) 2- The QL and 3- The Sord M68 (again the 1982 or so, with 68000 processor + Z80 in same machine )

    Reply
  • October 8, 2019 at 11:57 am
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    Another fantastic machine was the FP1100 from Casio with 8´´ FDD and a lot of add ons

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  • October 8, 2019 at 1:49 pm
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    Got one last DoReCo Party for a steal, 50€. The seller knows that i will lovingly use it and not sell it, so there is that.
    If you go and look at the Planet X3 Facebook group you can find a picture of the setup there, i replaced one of the 5¼" drives with a Gotek and have a XT-IDE installed with a 128MByte Flash Module i had floating around in the parts bin and i got myself a V20 upgrade for the machine. Next upgrade will be a 512 kByte memory card and a serial card so that i can finally use a mouse with it.

    Reply
  • October 10, 2019 at 1:26 am
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    Tandy and Microsoft had been "in cahoots" for a while before MS-DOS came around. My first computer was a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 1 (8K RAM, Level 1 BASIC). One of the cassette tape programs I bought for it was the "TRS-80 Editor/Assembler" (assembly code programming) made by some unknown company named "Microsoft". If I only knew then what I know now… :-/

    Reply
  • October 13, 2019 at 3:16 am
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    I had the 1000 RLX and one of the previous models with similar design language but was full height for normal expansion cards (forget what the suffix was).
    I used that thing for quite a while, and the RLX was my first exposure to VGA graphics.

    Reply
  • October 13, 2019 at 1:31 pm
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    But… Can it run crysis?

    Reply
  • October 15, 2019 at 2:06 am
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    UNDER 999! actual price: 5 cents below 999 fuck thanks radioshack I'm not going bankrupt over 5 cents

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  • October 17, 2019 at 7:57 am
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    Thanks for making the video…it was great revisiting a computer from my past!❤❤

    Reply
  • October 17, 2019 at 12:41 pm
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    And I'm still alive

    Reply
  • October 17, 2019 at 12:50 pm
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    My dad still has his Radio Shack/Tandy 100.

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  • October 17, 2019 at 1:44 pm
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    CGA or EGA at fact?

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  • October 18, 2019 at 1:24 am
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    ❤❤❤❤

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 1:45 am
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    Would you consider talking about your career history…because your insight into PC tech is fascinating, and always an informative discovery… I was a USAF Microwave Electronics tech. for Mobile Combat Comm. Systems… Wide Band, Ground Radio, & SAT-COM… Did a lot of QC worked at G-Tech, APC and my favorite was MPM Corp were we built SMT Assembly line systems for constructing SMT circuit boards… Some of the old systems you have restored or investigated, may have actually been built by me at APC… LOL 🙂 Honestly, I also hope to see you exploring the idea of doing Youtube video's that show step by step construction of a High-End PC model from Each year/Bi-Yearly… I have wanted to do that as a hobby for some time, and would greatly value your guidance here on video, since you likely live a long way from Gulf Coast Fl. Great Series, and we are going to try to set up GFM support for you soon !

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 1:52 am
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    Oh how things got outdated fast in those days. Nothing like today when my GTX 1080 can still crank games to close to max settings 3 years later without big problems.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 4:05 am
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    This video is very special to me as the first time i watched this video i was cuddling with my favorite cat, Geno who sadly died a few days later and that would be the last time i cuddled with Geno

    Reply
  • October 23, 2019 at 5:52 am
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    That's all computer i was having when i was young

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  • October 23, 2019 at 11:36 pm
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    Wow, that was an awesome history episode! Tandy was Awesome!

    Reply
  • October 24, 2019 at 12:51 am
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    What are those extra wires sticking out of the printer and floppy connector ports on the back of the EX? Also are you still using that 802.11g Airport Extreme or is it just a decoration at this point?

    Reply
  • October 26, 2019 at 5:22 am
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    Tandy was the name Radio Shack used for their shops in the UK. Just ask Techmoan.

    Reply
  • October 26, 2019 at 7:45 am
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    Those Tandy robots are fags.

    Reply
  • October 29, 2019 at 10:57 am
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    Nice flashback to my very young past… The Tandy 1000 EX was the first PC (that was truly all mine, in my room) given to me by my parents on my birthday. (Was a well used unit my dad acquired somehow, I reckon a friend at work). This was in the late 90s… I had only gotten rare moments to play on other computers before (always with supervision). Sadly, I was just way to young even then to have any clue as to what I was doing or what I had. All I knew at that time… was that if I did not know what to type at the screen, I didn't get to play the game. Only a few of the games I had been given with the system had "secret code" as I called it at the time, written on the cases. Rocky's Boots was my favourite game. I had NO clue about anything else the Tandy could do, nor never really messed with it too much (other then opening it up to see the guts…and getting in big trouble by dad for doing so). I did not have it too long, as a year later my dad bought a brand new Packard Bell system, and my siblings and I were dazzled by it's games, which of course made the Tandy totally unappealing and dad sold it.

    There are many times I wish I was born way earlier… so I could have lived through the glory days of a much more knowledgeable age (and more importantly, of working/money age). But such is life, there are pros and cons always!

    Reply
  • October 29, 2019 at 12:22 pm
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    My first MS-DOS machine was a Tandy 1000sl. First thing my dad did was upgrade the RAM TO 640k and put in a 2400 baud modem. Loved that machine.

    Reply
  • October 30, 2019 at 6:03 am
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    Awesome video! As a kid I loved going to RadioShack with my Dad. I'd always play with all the latest computers they had on display at the time, plus all their RC cars, Radios and electronics kits. Man RadioShack was such an awesome place to be back in the day. Come to think of it allot of electronics places were awesome. So many cool gizmos and gadgets to see and play with haha.

    Reply
  • October 31, 2019 at 4:55 am
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    Wow, we had that laptop! What a nostalgic trip!

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  • November 1, 2019 at 10:19 am
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    What's the game called at 12:46?
    I feel like I've played a similar game on the SNES.

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  • November 2, 2019 at 6:20 am
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    How does a guitar have an amp, the vibration from a string that can be made louder to a speaker. But computers are hard. Make a harp computer at that rate 🤣

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  • November 2, 2019 at 6:25 am
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    Could you have three lasers that move really fast toward glass to where it looks like a figure or something to make a monitor. Like Christmas decorations or little desk lasers that look like it making circled or ovals.

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  • November 2, 2019 at 6:32 am
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    Why did making the keyboard apart of the console stop. Better way for bits. More bits from keys. Don't need a keyboard. Mechanical magnet keyboards could even be apart of electromagnetism bits

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  • November 2, 2019 at 11:15 am
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    The Tandy 1000 was our family computer for many many years. I wrote a few middle school book reports on it in the early 90's using that blue and yellow word processor and printing it on the dot matrix printer. It also had a banner program where you could print out very large words in a banner. 10 year old me would print out swear words then hid the print from my parents. I also learned DOS commands and BASIC on this computer. It lasted so long our next computer was Windows 95. I have many fond memories of copying games from friends and then playing them on this computer. That computer was the catalyst of my love for computers and now at 38 I'm an IT Systems Admin. Great video! Thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  • November 2, 2019 at 1:42 pm
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    There's a Tandy 1000EX in episode 6 of the current series of American Horror Story.

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  • November 2, 2019 at 7:06 pm
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    I don't remember if I mentioned this, but I had the Tandy 1000 SX and I LOVED it. I wish I had never given it away when I upgraded to a 486. I had purchased many cards for it and even upgraded it with one of those new-fangled CD drives. Recently, I found the monitor from it when I was cleaning my mother's basement. I am waiting to use it on one of my older systems. As always, I LOVE your channel.

    By the way, there is no where within a 100 miles where anyone could just purchase a computer part. Where do you order all of those re-cap and other repair items from?

    Thanks.

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  • November 3, 2019 at 2:32 am
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    First computor was a Tandy 1000RL. 8086 10mhz processor with a 20 meg hard drive and 640k memory. One expantion slot which was filled with a 2400 baud modem. Joystick, and plugged into my stereo.

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  • November 3, 2019 at 9:12 pm
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    Gracias por los subtítulos en español. Me encanta este canal.

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  • November 4, 2019 at 8:43 am
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    I love the look of the tandy 1000 I am getting a job specifically to expand my computer collection and especially get a tandy 1000

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  • November 4, 2019 at 9:52 am
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    bazinga

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  • November 4, 2019 at 6:34 pm
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    The Inflation Calculator

    What cost $1199 in 1984 would cost $2925.03 in 2018.

    Also, if you were to buy exactly the same products in 2018 and 1984,

    they would cost you $1199 and $480.17 respectively.
    https://westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

    Reply
  • November 4, 2019 at 11:53 pm
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    I owned one many years ago!

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  • November 5, 2019 at 12:47 pm
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    Understand the moan about keyboards and cursor keys, but at the time many IBM PCs had no separate cursor keys and relied on using the number pad out of NUM Lock

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  • November 5, 2019 at 10:41 pm
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    I had a Tandy 1000 TX. I loved it. The only thing that frustrated me was I got a free copy of Windows from Microsoft. But I couldn’t use it because it required EGA. I wasn’t very technical back then so I didn’t understand because I thought all EGA was was 16 colors which my Tandy had. Also another funny moment was when I bought a memory expansion that increased my Tandy to one megabyte. But DOS would say I had 640k because I didn’t know what HIMEM and EMM386 was. It’s funny to laugh at that now.

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  • November 6, 2019 at 10:02 am
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    Miss my mother's Tandy 1000sx

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  • November 6, 2019 at 6:05 pm
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    What a beautiful tribute to this exquisite machine. Thank you so much for the great work and effort put here. I can feel real love to these babies coming from you man. You sir… are a hero. Cheers

    Reply
  • November 7, 2019 at 1:41 am
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    The original 1000 was a great system! some of the later systems with higher CPU clocks offer some of the best coverage for DOS gaming around.

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  • November 7, 2019 at 10:19 am
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    Well, this started a flood of memories, thanks for making this video. Reminded me 🙂 of our first digital camera, the Minolta Dimage V with detachable remote cabled or rotating "head", and held what, like 16 pictures? Thanks again.

    Reply
  • November 7, 2019 at 10:53 am
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    The Tandy was an absolute piece of shit.

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  • November 8, 2019 at 1:09 pm
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    I have had a lot of computers over the years. I regret selling my Tandy 1000sx which I had gotten as a Christmas gift from my Dad. I had previously used the Radio Shack CoCo. I learned a lot on that 1000sx. I enjoyed the memories this video brought back. I do still have the original keyboard from my 1000sx which I had upgraded to a 101 key keyboard. You had forgotten to mention that the Tandy keyboards were not compatible with those on other PC compatible systems.

    Reply
  • November 9, 2019 at 11:25 am
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    Yo what the heck I just disassembled a TI-99/4A and saw that exact same chip in there, that’s really cool to see that’s in other computers

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  • November 10, 2019 at 5:26 am
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    I loved my TRS-80 pocket computer, took it to school everyday.

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  • November 11, 2019 at 5:25 am
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    I don't even know why I watch these videos.

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  • November 11, 2019 at 10:10 pm
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    I was that kid that went to Radio Shack to play Kings Quest on the Demo Tandy 1000. It was like Christmas every time I walked in and got to play. Always wanted one but never owned one. I had a C64 so not all is lost..

    Reply
  • November 12, 2019 at 6:42 am
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    I miss the 80s

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  • November 12, 2019 at 10:55 am
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    I remember my Tandy 1000 and my external disk drive 😁

    Reply
  • November 13, 2019 at 3:36 am
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    Did you notice a 3 minutes and 40 seconds he said the word computer when he meant compatible obviously somebody wrote down c o m p as an abbreviation and he pronounce the computer and not compatible

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  • November 14, 2019 at 9:19 am
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    This took 11” boards, but the Tandy 1200 was an IBM clone. The 1000 forced you back to Tandy. The 1200 could be upgraded.

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  • November 14, 2019 at 10:30 am
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    I remember our Tandy 1000SL. Good times for a 5 year old!

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  • November 14, 2019 at 5:36 pm
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    У тебя что нос заложен англичанин.

    Reply
  • November 15, 2019 at 4:30 pm
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    Hey mate, great channel and videos, thanks!

    Reply
  • November 20, 2019 at 12:28 am
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    I had a 1000SL. It was pretty cool albeit slow as hell even at that time. I remember messing with the DAC and recording Terminator 2 audio clips on it off the vcr. I was much more of an NES kid than a computer gamer kid but I loved the Sierra games. Cool video.

    Reply
  • November 20, 2019 at 8:08 am
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    Dont you have any Atari 520 or 1040?, they were the best musicomputers for us musicians at the time (and then of course Mac)

    Reply
  • November 21, 2019 at 3:45 am
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    Seria certo dizer que o DOS DE alguma maneia ainda e usado? O DOS e nescessario pra Boot

    Reply
  • November 22, 2019 at 9:07 am
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    I had Tandy 1000 serial number 936. It was more like 0000000936 or something like that. Early adopter is what I am saying. I had actually bought a Model IV like one week before the 1000 came out. I returned it to get the 1000. Full disclosure, I worked at a Radio Shack computer center in Santa Rosa, CA

    Reply
  • November 23, 2019 at 2:52 pm
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    Excellent, and the TI-99/4A got a mention. I do wonder if the apartment door in the Big Bang Theory was number 4A because of the TI? 😉
    Sheldon is from Texas after all 😉

    Reply
  • November 23, 2019 at 5:49 pm
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    Why would Aliens, advanced enough to teleport into a store, trying, for some reason, to steal earth technology care about the sale price … I mean, come on, at least try! You are better than this, Tandy Marketing Department.

    Reply
  • November 24, 2019 at 7:04 am
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    Reminds me of when Italian manufacturer Olivetti made the M24, a PC business clone that ended up more powerful than the real thing (twice as fast, better resolution, …).

    Reply
  • November 24, 2019 at 11:07 pm
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    The Tandy 1000 SL was my first computer.

    Reply
  • November 25, 2019 at 11:58 pm
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    I like how the equivalent Tandy 1000's price is a power of 2 just like memory. = 2048.90

    Reply
  • November 27, 2019 at 4:27 am
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    Young Sheldon, the most punchable face on TV. I fucking hate that kid.

    Reply
  • November 28, 2019 at 7:21 am
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    Wow…memories…my first computer was the Tandy TX along with a copy of Thexder. I had plenty of fun with Deskmate too…those were the days

    Reply
  • November 28, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    How is the keyboard? IBM's Model F is the best keyboard ever made, but that's an impossibly high bar, so how does it compare to, say, a Model M?

    Reply
  • November 29, 2019 at 11:44 pm
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    DANG. I remember when work got a TRS-80 in the front office; nobody was allowed to touch it, like it was made of GOLD or something. I remember thinking the silver plastic seemed chintzy, but looking at the advert in your video, and checking an inflation calculator: According to an inflation calculator, $5000 in 1984 dollars would be $12,384 in today's dollars!
    I wonder if it'd be interesting to do a comparison of TRS-DOS vs CP/M vs unix vs DOS and other command line OS's of the day.

    Reply
  • November 29, 2019 at 11:58 pm
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    Mr. 8-Bit Guy; I like your "knob and tube"-style network cabling 😉

    Reply
  • November 30, 2019 at 9:40 am
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    Wow am just discovering your channel, thanks you very much for show us all this fancy retro things. Greets from Venezuela.

    Reply
  • November 30, 2019 at 12:13 pm
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    our college used Tandy 1000's in the office up to 1993, networked to a very early Netware server on an ATT server box. I was a work study there. Our printers were IBM selectrics with RS232 cards. It was a bit retro, even at the time.

    Reply
  • November 30, 2019 at 5:48 pm
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    It seems to me that the IBM PC was the best MS (PC) DOS computer in 1984. Just saying!
    OK. 8-bit guy makes a good argument for the Tandy 1000. I recall compatibility problems with all sorts of "compatibles" early on.

    Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 1:15 am
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    First I designed spectrum for machine code assembly, then I designed TS-80 basic for version greyhound racing ( list for CODES )

    Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 1:30 am
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    Выплюнь Банан из-за рта а потом Вякай

    Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 2:26 am
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    Kraftwerk 19:06 😅

    Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 5:47 pm
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    Came here after watching your tech support tales hahaha it's a good video to watch after that

    Reply
  • December 2, 2019 at 9:29 pm
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    Isn't this the problem with others such as IBM and apple, they all got destroyed by the competition because they just sit around and didn't innovate, apple probably managed to stay afloat because of the schools still using their 2LCs and their 'quirky' computers such as the iMac.

    Reply
  • December 4, 2019 at 1:38 pm
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    What a trip down memory lane. My first computer… 7Mhz LOL. Now I'm looking at getting a Ryzen 3900x for my next upgrade with 32 GIGAbytes of RAM. Lol how times have changed.

    Reply
  • December 4, 2019 at 2:50 pm
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    I ran a paint program in GEM using 640×200 and 16 colors. You can put two colors in a grid and use as a brush to paint or fill with and create a new color. Sometimes color mixes sharing a color would bleed when in adjacent fills and annoy me. Those were the days. It was an Amstrad PC1512 and PC1640.

    Reply

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